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Historic Locations

Clarence Rockland

Town of Hawkesbury

Hawkesbury

52 - Saint-Alphonse-de-Liguori Church
53 - St. Paul’s Church
54 - Maison de l’île
55 - Higginson House
56 - Former James Ross House
57 - Former Hersey House

52 - Saint-Alphonse-de-Liguori Church
- Église Saint-Alphonse-de-Liguori
c. 1896

470 Main Street East, Hawkesbury, Ontario

Located in the heart of the town, this imposing grey stone church was constructed in 1926 exactly where the first Catholic church of Hawkesbury stood. The latter, built in 1896, burned down in 1924. The two uneven steeples that make the church stand out today were added during the 1930s. The building also has lovely round windows decorated with stained glass and a beautiful rose-window in front.

Map to this location

53 - St. Paul’s Church
- Église St. Paul
c.1870

166 John Street, Hawkesbury, Ontario

The congregation was founded in 1829 under the leadership of Rev. John McLaurin who came from Scotland in 1819. The early services were held in the  L‘Orignal courthouse and in Hawkesbury in the local schoolhouse where Rev. McLaurin was schoolmaster. The present church was built in 1870 at a cost of $2,700.00 and dedicated in January 1871. The early church was heated with two wood stoves prior to 1903. In 1904, a fire caused by the basement furnace, damaged the interior of the church, including the stained glass windows, with the exception of the east window. Replaced memorial windows were dedicated to the memory of the Campbell, Gordon, MacGibbon and Rutherford families.

Map to this location

54 - Maison de l’île
c. 1810

2 John Street Hawkesbury, Ontario

La maison de l’île du Chenail was built circa 1810 by two brothers, Jack and Robert Hamilton, who established the administrative office for their sawmill there. This building also housed a bank (vault still exists today), an infirmary, a general store and a post office. Historically, this site was the development centre of the Town, making its value even greater. Standing on the only piece of the Chenail Island left, the building is the last remnant of what was the most important Canadian sawmill in the 1870s. The building was designated a historic monument by the Hawkesbury Town Council in 1995. Today, this oldest building in the town is home to Le Chenail Cultural Centre .

Map to this location

55 - Higginson House
- La maison Higginson

517 McGill Street, Hawkesbury, Ontario

This beautiful house, crowned with dormer windows, was built during the second half of the 19th century for James Dandy, a shoe manufacturer. It was named after John W. Higginson who started the first general store in 1820. Aside from being postmaster and owning a telegraph office, Higginson was very much involved in the administration of local schools and the town. The residence, an original due to its octagonal shape, has a lovely veranda decorated with mouldings.

Map to this location

56 - Former James Ross House
- Ancienne maison James Ross
c. 1850

416 McGill Street, Hawkesbury, Ontario

This beautiful stone house was formerly owned by James Ross who was a stone mason and merchant. His family operated the Ross quarry which supplied stone for the Carillon lock and for Fort Henry. His family was also involved in the East Hawkesbury school for 2 decades.
In 1954, Noël Berthiaume bought this lovely home on McGill Street and opened the Salon Funéraire Noël Funeral Home Ltée.Ltd. After the death of Noël in 1969, his wife Armande maintained the operation of the funeral home thus ensuring the transfer of the company to the third generation.  Their three sons, René, Yves and Robert became licenced funeral directors and René’s son Jean-René became the fourth generation to join the family business which first began in 1896.

Map to this location

57 - Former Hersey House
- Ancienne maison Hersey
c. 1846

382 McGill Street, Hawkesbury, Ontario

Among the early settlers whose lives were identified with this place were two brothers Charles and Z. S. M. Hersey from Leicester, Mass. The former came here about 1819, the latter in 1830. Both were in partnership in the mercantile business for a number of years and Charles operated a tannery for a long time. Z. S. M. Hersey became manager of the McGill Street estate and subsequently purchased the House.

Map to this location